What We Treat

  • Headaches & Migraines
  • Neck Pain
    • Facet Joint Pain
    • Osteoarthritis of the Neck
    • Disc Injury
  • Upper Back & Rib Pain
    • Facet Joint Sprain
    • Costochondritis
  • Lower Back Pain
    • Joint or Facet Sprain
    • Ligamentous & Capsular Strain
    • Muscular Trigger Points
    • Sciatica (Nerve Impingement)
    • Disc Injury (Strain, Bulge or Prolapse)
    • Osteoarthritis of the Lumbar Spine
    • Spondylolisthesis
    • Sacroiliac Joint Sprain
    • Viscerosomatic Referral
  • Arthritis
    • Osteoarthritis
    • Rheumatoid Arthritis 
  •  Shoulder Pain
    • Rotator Cuff Tears/Strains/Tendonitis/Tendinopathy
    • Shoulder Impingement
    • Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)
    • Postural Tension/Decompensations
    • Labral Tear
    • Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)
    • Postural Tension/Decompensations
    • Labral Tear
    • Referred Pain

 

Headaches & Migraines

Headaches

Headaches can vary broadly in their intensity and the affect they have on patients, therefore, treatment always needs to be individualised. At The Homebody Clinic we are passionate about finding the cause of your headaches which can help point us in the right direction on what to treat, how and what education/guidance we can give you to also help manage their frequency and intensity. We are passionate about helping headache suffers get their life back.

At The Homebody Clinic, we have experience in treating the following types of headaches:

  • Cervicogenic Headache – this type of headache has a direct cause and correlation to the structure and function of your neck. Typically, these headaches refer to one side of your head, starting from your neck, and present as an ache at the base of the skull, forehead, and behind the eyes and eyebrows.
  • Post-Concussion Syndrome – this headache can be felt after there is impact with your head. It is often combined with dizziness, and problems with memory and concentration. If there are any concerning symptoms associated with your headache, we are able to refer you for further imaging and or investigation with your local GP.
  • Sinus Headache – this type of headache is often felt below and or above the eyes and the pain is typically described as a strong pressure build up.
  • Tension Type Headaches – a common and generally mild type headache that may be caused by poor posture, stress, poor ergonomics and/or jaw clenching. A tension type headache is generally described as a “vice like” band around your head.
  • TMJ (jaw) Headache – this headache may be felt to the side of your temples and alongside your jaw. Grinding and teeth clenching, most likely accompanied by stress are often the main causes for this type of headache.
  • Cluster Headache – typically a patient with this type of headache will present with severe unilateral pain, typically lasting 15-180 minutes, and perhaps felt a few times during the day. They will typically present in cycles, and be accompanied by pain free periods too.

Migraines

Migraines are a common neurological disorder. There are many different presentations of migraines – and pain can be felt in many different positions. There is no exact known cause for migraines, but there are a multitude of factors contributing to them; for example, stress, dehydration, poor sleep, medications, alcohol, certain foods, smoking, hormonal changes and head trauma. Migraines typically present as a throbbing or pulsating headache that can start off one-sided and last between 4-72 hours and can be accompanied with nausea or vomiting, sensitivity to light or sound or even changes in vision.

Treatment

Treatment of your headaches or migraines may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, stretching, joint manipulation, articulation, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), dry needling (hyperlink), manipulation, and/ or exercise/stretching prescription and modifications.

During treatment it is often necessary to release chronic stress and strain from past injuries and trauma, particularly in your head and neck. This will not only help relieve the presenting headache or migraine but will also aim to reduce the chance of a recurrence.

Neck Pain

Unfortunately, neck pain is very common in our modern world and therefore a common presentation seen at The Homebody Clinic. There are many causes of neck pain and finding the root cause will determine the best management for you. Neck pain can arise from whiplash, phone or computer use, poor work posture, sporting injuries, stress, arthritis or mechanical stressors.

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly see the following neck pain presentations:

Facet Joint Sprain

Facet joints are small joints on the back part of your spine which aid in providing different ranges of motion for your spine. Like other joints, facet joints can become inflamed, irritated or injured if they are progressively overloaded, stretched or compressed. Facet joint sprains can affect people of all ages.

Symptoms of facet joint sprain:

  • Neck pain and headaches.
  • Limited range of movement – which can result in pain when the joint is moved in a particular direction, for example, looking up or rotating your neck.
  • Pain that is worse in the morning or after neck movement.
  • Tenderness of the neck muscles and joints.

Osteoarthritis of The Neck

Neck osteoarthritis (OA) is also known as degenerative joint disease, this is commonly a result of age-related changes, however it can also occur years after a trauma to the area, for example after a car accident or concussion. Most commonly OA is seen in patients that have experienced excessive load through their head and neck through their occupation or exercise, especially if repetitive. Unfortunately, in the modern world we are seeing higher rates of osteoarthritis due to poor posture associated with computer and mobile phone use. It’s critical in OA that strength and movement exercises are performed for the neck and upper body to slow the progression of the condition.

Symptoms of osteoarthritis of the neck:

  • Gradual onset of neck pain.
  • Reduced neck flexibility.
  • Stiffness in the mornings or after long periods of immobility.
  • Crepitus or cracking sounds with neck movement.
  • Headaches.

Disc Injury

Your spine is made up of vertebrae (bones) and discs. These spongy discs are located between each bone and are designed to be shock absorbers for the spine. Therefore, they contribute to protecting the health of the bones, joints and surrounding muscles.

An acute injury can irritate and damage a disc, however, more commonly the outer layer of the disc becomes weak from minor tearing over time which can influence the integrity of the tissue. This weakened outer rim combined with excessive compression can make it vulnerable to injury. Acute trauma or significant force or impact to the head or neck can commonly cause disc injuries. Car accidents, whiplash injuries or work-place injuries can be examples of such trauma. Other examples include repeated minor injuries over a long period, strong head contact in sports, straining from repetitive lifting or prolonged and sustained poor postures, as well as age.

Due to the close nature of the disc and the nerves in the neck, a disc injury can often impinge or compress nearby nerves and create neurological symptoms to the upper extremity.

Symptoms of a disc injury:

  • Neck and upper back pain.
  • Headaches.
  • Tenderness of the neck.
  • Reduced neck flexibility.
  • Pain on neck movement.
  • If nerve compression is present people can experience; Numbness or tingling in the arms, hands or fingers
  • Weakness of the arm or hand
  • If a disc injury is suspected it is likely we will refer you for further imaging to confirm the diagnosis and advice you on your most suitable management plan.

Treatment 

At The Homebody Clinic we are skilled in determining the cause, treatment and management of your neck pain. Your treatment plan will be tailored to you and will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal function and preventing re-injury of your neck. Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink) stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), and/or exercise prescription. A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term.

Upper Back & Rib Pain

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly see people affected by rib and or middle back pain. It is a really vital area of movement. Our ribs start from the top of the collar bone and take up approximately two thirds of your chest/abdomen region. Our ribs are important to protect our vital organs, assist us with breathing, and serve as attachment points for important muscles of the torso, shoulders, neck and lower back.

Osteopaths see and treat musculoskeletal conditions that cause pain in the upper back and ribs. However, due to many organs being protected underneath this area there can often be a viscerosomatic referral pattern present. Our organs share the same nerve supply as some of the muscles and parts of the spinal column, so if one area is affected, another area can be as well. For example, your gall bladder can refer to your right shoulder blade/rib region and produce pain in that region. Osteopaths are skilled to diagnose a referral pattern, manage it and refer where needed.

Conditions we commonly see in the upper back and rib cage at The Homebody Clinic:

Facet Joint Sprain

Thoracic facet joints are small joints at the posterolateral aspect of the thoracic spinal column. Their primary role is to help bear load through the thoracic spine. Like other joints, facet joints have a capsule of ligaments that surround them which can be susceptible to inflammation and damage if they are progressively overloaded, stretched or compressed. Similar to an ankle sprain, fast, sudden movements of the torso can sprain these joints, as can a whiplash type injury, repetitive coughing and or sneezing or lifting something heavy with poor biomechanics. Pain can present in the mid- back but also refer to the shoulder blade or sometimes to the chest and along the ribs. There is most commonly a sudden onset to pain with associated limited motion in your arms, torso and neck.

A common presentation can be described as that annoying pain between your shoulder blades or an intense like a stabbing feeling or a constant ache that can’t be stretched out.

Rib injuries can be acutely painful or constantly annoying and associated with poor ergonomics or desk posture. A lot of our daily tasks involves our arm out in front of us, for example, holding laundry, lifting kids, housework, mouse and desk work, and driving. Due to reduced shoulder blade strength and control, this means our ribs and muscles of the shoulder blade are susceptible to being pulled forward with these postures resulting in a rib sprain.

Costochondritis

Costochondritis is one of the most common causes of musculoskeletal chest pain. Costochondritis occurs when there is inflammation of the cartilage at the attachment sites of the ribs and the sternum (breast bone). At The Homebody Clinic we see this pain most commonly from repetitive overuse, however other causes such as persistent coughing, certain forms of arthritis and infections can also lead to costochondritis. Pain will often be present with breathing, and coughing or sneezing, and often accompanied by a radiation sensation along the rib line, providing pain in your chest, back or shoulder blade. 

Treatment

Due to the close relationship the mid back and rib cage have with other areas of your body, treatment and assessment will usually involve other areas of your body such as your shoulder, neck, lower back and hips. Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink) stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), and/or exercise prescription. A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term.

Lower Back Pain

Statistics show eighty percent of the Australian population, regardless of age or gender, will suffer from back pain at some point in their lives. For many people this pain may be chronic, while for others it can resolve quickly. At The Homebody Clinic we appreciate how debilitating back pain can be and the impact it can have on your life. We are passionate about helping people suffering with back pain to lead a pain free, unrestricted life.

At The Homebody Clinic, we have experience treating the following types of lower back pain:

Joint or Facet Sprain

Facet joints are small joints on the back part of your vertebrae which aid in providing different ranges of motion for your spine. Like other joints, facet joints have a capsule of ligaments that surround them, which can become inflamed or irritated if they are progressively overloaded, stretched or compressed. Pre-existing lumbar spine conditions, poor biomechanics and postural decompensations can increase the likelihood of irritation to these joints. The patient will usually present with lower back pain and a limited range of movement.

Ligamentous & Capsular Strain

Just like any other part of your body, your ligaments that surround, stabilise and support your spine can strain as well and reproduce pain and limited range of motion. Osteopaths are trained to diagnose which ligament may be affected and treat accordingly. Generally, a ligament will become damaged from an over extension of an activity or from poor lumbar biomechanics.

Muscular Trigger Points

Sensitive areas of tight muscle fibres can form in your muscles after injuries or overuse. These sensitive areas are called trigger points. A trigger point in a muscle can cause strain and pain throughout the muscle and sometimes produce a referral pain in a distinctive pattern.

Sciatica (Nerve Impingement)

Nerve pain that is caused by irritation to the sciatic nerve is commonly known as sciatica. The sciatic nerve starts at your lower back, radiates deep into the buttock and runs along the back of both legs to the base of your foot. Typically, a patient presenting with sciatic irritation will describe a sharp burning and numbness sensation in a referral pattern. Sciatica can be relieved with gentle movement including walking, heat packs and manual therapy. There are many reasons for sciatic nerve impingement. A condition called piriformis syndrome can lead to sciatica, where the nerve is entrapped by tightness in the piriformis muscle (one of the gluteal muscles), producing pain and neurological radiation symptoms. It can also be caused from disc pathology to the low back, spinal stenosis, degeneration to the joints or discs of the back and may include muscle spasm of the back and buttock muscles. Your osteopath will take a thorough history, understand the reasons WHY this is happening and provide measures to help manage this condition to avoid recurrence.

Disc Injury (Strain, Bulge or Prolapse)

Anatomically, your spine is made up of bones (vertebrae) and discs. These spongy discs are located between each bone and are designed to act as shock absorbers. Therefore, they contribute to protecting the health of the bones, joints and surrounding muscles. An acute injury can irritate and damage a disc, however, more commonly we find the outer edge of the disc become weak from minor tearing over time which can influence the integrity of the tissue. This weakened outer rim combined with excessive compression can make it vulnerable to injury. Age, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and poor movement patterns or ergonomics can all increase your susceptibility to a disc problem. Symptoms may present as a broad lower back pain, reduction in range of motion and sometimes be accompanied by nerve compression symptoms such as numbness, weakness or tingling into the groin, leg, and/or buttock.

Osteoarthritis of the Lumbar Spine

Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease, is commonly a result of age-related changes. OA normally develops in people as they age, therefore it is more commonly seen in the elderly population. It’s critical in OA that strength and movement exercises are performed to maintain mobility and slow the progression of the condition.

Spondylolisthesis

Spondylolisthesis is the forward slippage of one vertebral body on the vertebral body below. This can create instability in the spine and cause lower back pain. It normally starts with stress fractures around the joints, which once broken can allow for this abnormal movement. Spondylolisthesis can occur from trauma especially in spinal hyperextension, degeneration or genetic defect.

Sacroiliac Joint Sprain

Your sacroiliac joints (SIJ) are joints formed on either side of your tailbone (sacrum) and the back of your pelvic bone (ilium). Like other joints, there are several strong ligamentous attachments to this joint to aid in stabilising it. When these ligaments become stretched it can result in unilateral or bilateral lower back pain. Pain can result from repetitive and prolonged leaning forward, or twisting activities and can be more common in pregnancy. Mostly the pain will be localised to just outside to the lower spine, but can also refer to the inner groin and can produce a sharp or dull aching sensation.

Viscerosomatic Referral

The spine and organs share similar nerve and vascular supply. Therefore, if there is a distribution at the spine, it can often affect the referral organ, and visa-versa. For example, right shoulder pain can be associated with irritation to your gall bladder. Osteopaths are trained to diagnose and differentiate between back pain from a musculoskeletal cause, and back pain from a visceral origin through the use of a thorough case history and examination and then treat and manage accordingly.

Treatment

At The Homebody Clinic we are skilled to help determine the cause of your lower back pain, treatment and management. Your treatment plan will reflect an individualised plan that will focus on reducing your pain, restoring your normal function, preventing re-injury but also educating you on your pain and how you can best manage it for the future too. Your management plan may include stretching/strengthening exercises, along with ergonomic review and if need be a referral to another therapist such as a Pilates instructor or an exercise physiologist.

Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), and/or exercise prescription.

Arthritis

Arthritis is the leading cause of chronic pain and can have a severe impact on a patient’s quality of life. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis and they vary greatly in impact, severity and symptoms.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of joint disease. Osteoarthritis most commonly affects the weight bearing joints, such as the knee, hip, fingers and big toe.

The most common symptoms are:

Pain and stiffness of the joints that develops slowly, over months or even years

Usually worse on an activity like using stairs, but can also be very achy at night

Audible clicking, grinding and/or popping sounds is common

Loss of mobility in the joint

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a common autoimmune disease and a form of inflammatory arthritis. In rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system targets the lining of the joints, causing inflammation and joint damage, resulting in pain of bilateral joints.

The most common symptoms are:

  • Joint pain, swelling, and tenderness to touch.
  • Stiffness in the joints, especially in the morning.
  • Symmetrical, for example both shoulders, or both hips.

There is currently no cure for the majority of arthritic conditions, however the research is very consistent that movement helps, and not moving can often make your arthritis worse. Reducing your pain will be our first goal in order to get the joint back moving soon and get you back to exercise. We will also educate you on beneficial exercises/activities to do, exercises to avoid and any other diet/lifestyle factors that can help.

Shoulder Pain

Shoulder pain is a common presentation seen at The Homebody Clinic. The shoulder joint is said to be the most complex joint of the body. It has this fascinating ability to provide great strength to the upper body and as a result allows us to achieve many of our daily life activities, whilst maintaining mobility. Due to its incredible flexibility, it requires muscle stability and sound biomechanics to function correctly. Unfortunately, similarly to the neck, shoulder pain has become increasingly common in our modern world due to the increase in computer work and phone usage.

Some causes of shoulder pain we can assist with at The Homebody Clinic are:

Rotator Cuff Tears/Strains/Tendonitis/Tendinopathy

The rotator cuff is a group of small muscles that surround the shoulder joint. They are responsible for providing most of the stability to the shoulder joint. While an injury may occur to one particular muscle or tendon in the rotator cuff they work as a synergistic team, therefore treatment and rehabilitation focuses on the whole rotator cuff, rather than a single muscle. The degree of tear or strain to the rotator cuff can vary from a mild strain to a full rupture. Issues to this area are generally from poor posture or from the rotator cuff being overstretched or over strengthened (too hard and or too fast). Other common causes include throwing sports, heavy manual labour especially overhead work, repetitive arm movement and lack of rest. Rotator cuff issues will present with pain or weakness overhead, tenderness over the shoulder joint as well as stiffness and pain whilst lying on the affected shoulder.

Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement occurs when shoulder tendons (biceps or rotator cuff tendons) and/or the subacromial bursa become entrapped and compressed due to insufficient space between the head of the humerus and the tip of the shoulder blade. This impingement can lead to inflammation and therefore pain especially of arm movement away from the body. Focus of treatment is around increasing space in the shoulder and surrounding joints to reduce the inflammation and pain. There is always a big focus on the “why?” and the cause of this impingement to help prevent reoccurrence.

Frozen shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)

Adhesive capsulitis is an acute inflammatory condition that can arise spontaneously or after an injury or shoulder surgery. This condition can last over a year, and generally occurs in 3 stages. If the patient has frozen shoulder, they will generally present with shoulder pain and accompanied stiffness. Treatment can help reduce the pain as well as the time frame of this chronic condition.

Postural Tension/Decompensations

Should pain related to posture is unfortunately extremely common in our modern world due to our use of devices and our increase in stress and a sedentary lifestyle. Tension in the shoulder can lead to shoulder pain, neck pain, headaches, upper extremity nerve pain and more. Treatment aims to release the tension, improve your posture and shoulder and neck biomechanics but also educate you on ways to improve this over the long-term including ergonomics and exercises to help.

Labral Tear

The labrum is a ring of cartilage that surrounds a joint to help with stability. The labrum tissue can be found in the hip and shoulder joints and can be torn with trauma or from poor overuse/poor biomechanics leading to wear and tear. A tear can appear in any aspect of the labrum (front, back and top). Labral tears can be caused by excessive mechanical force through the shoulder which may happen with a fall or a dislocation, or from repetitive overuse at the joints end range. Patients complain of pain at the front of the shoulder which may refer down the arm or to the shoulder blade, there can be a clicking or popping sound associated or giving way and an unstable feeling of the shoulder. Treatment will focus on education to help strengthen the area and further stabilise the joint, as well as focusing on techniques to work on better alignment and biomechanics of the joint to assist reducing the load off the injured labrum, aiming to prevent further damage.

Referred Pain

Pain in the shoulder can sometimes be unrelated to the musculoskeletal structures in the area and can instead be a referral, either a viserosomatic referral from related organs, or from structures above and below the shoulder area. Referred pain will most commonly be from your neck or in some cases the diaphragm (your primary breathing muscle) or from certain organs such as the gallbladder or the heart.

Symptoms of shoulder pain may include∶

  • ‘catching’ sensation when raising the arm or reaching
  • sharp pain when moving your arm
  • weakness in your arm or grip strength
  • throbbing and aching in shoulder whilst sleeping/lying on that side
  • pain radiating down the arm (can also be described as numbness, tingling or weakness)
  • neck and shoulder stiffness

Once a sound diagnosis is made, we will aim to reduce your shoulder pain and improve your condition by increasing muscular flexibility to the shoulder, neck, mid back, chest and shoulder blade. It is very common for treatment of your shoulder to also consist of assessment and treatment of your neck, jaw, mid back, shoulder blade, lower back and upper extremity due to the postural strains and decompensations that could occur in surrounding joints and lead to your shoulder problem.

To aid in your shoulder recovery it is common to leave treatment with a sound education on ways you too can manage your pain, whether that be by providing stretching and strengthening exercises and/or education about desk or work ergonomics. Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), or dry needling (hyperlink). A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term. At The Homebody Clinic we may refer you for scans, or to another therapist or specialists that can help with conjunct to hands-on treatment if need be.

Sports Injuries

Whether you are an elite athlete or a social, weekend sportsperson, at The Homebody Clinic we can help prevent and treat many sporting injuries, including:

  • Rotator cuff strain, sprain, tendinitis or tear
  • Shoulder dislocation rehabilitation
  • Tennis and golfer’s elbow
  • Wrist and finger sprains
  • Lower back injuries
  • Groin strain and tear
  • Hamstring strain and tear
  • Corked thigh
  • Osteitis pubis
  • Patella tracking disorder
  • Sprain or tear of ACL, PCL, MCL, LCL
  • Meniscus injuries
  • Bursitis of the shoulder, elbow and hip
  • Shin splints and stress fractures
  • Compartment syndrome
  • Calf strain or tear
  • Ankle sprain
  • Achilles sprain and tendonitis
  • Plantar fasciitis

At The Homebody Clinic we can diagnose your sporting injury and if need be, refer you for appropriate imaging. The diagnosis is important, but even more so is to identify and treat the cause of your injury. We will assess the function of your muscles and joints and determine if muscular weakness or joint stiffness predisposed you to your injury.

Our biggest goal is to get you back exercising as soon as possible and to keep you moving, however that

may look. If there is a time where you need to rest from your sport due to injury, we can help advise on other ways to exercise, or stretch/strengthen your body so you can remain active, as we know that is incredibly important for physical and mental health. We have a strong relationship with local Pilates, yoga studios and gyms over the Sunshine Coast and have found this important in getting you back to exercise as efficiently and safely as possible.

Sophie is also a yoga teacher and anatomy teacher for yoga students so has an in-depth knowledge of yoga pose modifications and was to keep you practicing and stretching, regardless of your injury.

At The Homebody Clinic we also encourage maintenance type treatments if you are exercising or competing on a regular basis. This can help reduce incidence of injury and help keep you on track to assist in your performance. Treatment can help maintain the alignment and biomechanics of your joints which is integral for your body’s function and to help reduce injury.

Wrist & Hand Pain

Our wrist and hands are widely used in our day-to-day activities, they are the key to us completing simple and complex coordinated tasks throughout the day. Our wrists and hands are prone to overuse (especially in our modern world) and tend to also be the first thing we fall on!

Both the wrist and hands are made up of an extensive array of ligaments, muscles, tendons, joints, nerves and blood vessels – which if injured, can result in more than just pain – but can affect fine motor skills, coordination, strength and sensation (pins and needles or numbness).

Some causes of wrist/hand pain we can assist you with at The Homebody Clinic are:

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

In the wrist we have 8 small bones that lie in two rows under our fingers, that are covered by a piece of connective tissue. Collectively, this creates the carpal tunnel. The carpal tunnel plays an important role in protecting nerves and blood vessels that run underneath it, as well as keeping the forearm tendons intact when we move our fingers. If the tunnel becomes compromised (compressed, inflamed or irritated) and the space becomes reduced, pressure can be placed on the nerve that passes through this tunnel, and supplies the thumb, index, middle and part of the ring finger with sensation and strength. If this nerve compresses, it can lead to numbness, tingling, burning or a sharp pain in the affected fingers as well as weakness and pain sleeping.

This is a pain we commonly treat at The Homebody Clinic, especially if there has been a fall to the area, the patient is pregnant and or there is repetitive overuse of the hand and wrist.

De Querviain’s Tenosynovitis

De Querviain’s Tenosynovitis is swelling with accompanied pain on the tendons that run along the thumb side of the hand and attach to the base of the thumb. Again, repetitive overuse and strain of these tendons

  • Tennis elbow which is tendinopathy of the extensor muscles known as lateral epicondylitis.
  • Golfers elbow which is tendinopathy of the flexor muscles of the forearm, also known as medial epicondylitis.

This is a common cause of tendon inflammation. The patient will present with local swelling and pain and weakness during wrist and hand movements such as gripping or holding.

Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear

The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is a made up of cartilage, ligaments and other soft tissues to form a complex. The complex acts to stabilise the forearm bones at the end of the forearm. Damage to this complex can result in pain on the pinky finger side of the wrist, and there is often an associated click with the pain. A patient will often report the wrist feeling unstable with a presented weakness. Again, due to our modern world, this injury can come from wear and tear, as well as a fall or fracture to the hand.

Ligament Damage/Joint Sprain

Within the wrist joint there are a number of important ligaments that aid in supporting the joint. Similar to other areas of the body, the ligaments of the wrist can become damaged or irritated from excessive strain on them. Ligament sprains can result in swelling, pain and tenderness and sometimes bruising. Pain is usually exacerbated with heavy lifting and this can result in weakness of the area.

Treatment

Your osteopath at The Homebody Clinic is skilled to diagnose and treat your wrist and hand. Treatment and management of your pain will focus on pain reduction, restoring function and preventing re-injury. Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), and/or stretching and strengthening prescription. A personalised management plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term.

Elbow Pain

We forget how much we use our arms – until we cant!

Overuse of the forearm muscles can particularly come from workplace ergonomics. Having an appropriate workplace set up is integral to helping this heal efficiently. Keyboard, mouse position, desk height, laptop or monitor height and chair set up can play a big part. Educating you on correct ergonomics is something we can help you with.

Getting on top of elbow pain early helps!

Conditions of the elbow we commonly treat at The Homebody Clinic:

Epicondylitis

Tendons are strong, rope-like structures that attach muscles to bone, this means they are essential for making us mobile. Tendons mostly become inflamed when they are overused or under prepared for exercise/repetitive strength movements.

The two types of epicondylitis we treat are:

In tendinopathies the tendon initially becomes inflamed and painful but still functions reasonably well. If left untreated and managed incorrectly it can develop into a chronic issue with weakness, persistent pain and an increased risk of tendon tearing or rupture.

The increase usage of devices in the modern world can lead to tendon damage, as well as physical jobs that require heavy manual labour, and repetitive tasks from improper biomechanics are the common causes for tendon inflammation.

Forearm Muscle Strains

Muscles are the power generating structures that make our body move. Muscles can be damaged suddenly while playing sport or performing activities of daily living but can also be strained slowly over a longer period of time. Strains and tears can vary from a mild tear to a full rupture and therefore treatment and management will also vary. A strain will typically produce sharp pain and tenderness over the affected muscle and sometimes result in swelling and or bruising.

Ligament Sprains

Within the elbow joint there are a number of important ligaments including your ulnar collateral ligament (on the inside of the elbow) and the lateral collateral ligament (on the outside of the elbow) that aid in supporting the joint. Ligaments can become damaged or irritated from excessive strain on them and this can range from a slight overstretch to a complete rupture. If they become damaged, pain is a common symptom that can range from mild to severe, as well as possible weakness and localised swelling, and reduced stability within the elbow.

Treatment

At The Homebody Clinic we are skilled to diagnose and manage your elbow pain. Your treatment plan will be tailored to you and will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal function and preventing re-injury of your elbow. Gentle stretching, soft tissue treatment and strengthening can help with elbow pain, as well as measures like bracing and postural positions that your osteopath will discuss if this is needed for you. A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term.

Knee Pain

Knee pain is one of the most common areas we treat at The Homebody Clinic. Knee pain can present in people of all ages and activity levels. Knee pain can be caused by trauma, exercise, degeneration, and most commonly referred from injuries or misalignment of the same side hip or foot/ankle. As the knee joint sits in-between the foot/ankle and the hip it can often be affected and take too much load or a poor distribution of weight by the above and below joints. Your keens are vital for key daily movements, such as bending, lifting, walking and running, therefore knee pain can be debilitating and very disruptive.

Ligaments, tendons and muscles are crucial for optimal function of your lower limb. At The Homebody Clinic we aim to reduce your knee pain, strengthen your knee joint and prevent further knee injuries by diagnosing, treating and educating you on your pain.

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly see the following knee pain presentations:

Patellofemoral Joint Pain

Patellofemoral joint pain this is an ‘umbrella’ term used to describe pain in the soft tissues around the knee cap when there is no diagnosis on x-rays and MRI’s. This means the diagnosis weighs heavily on a thorough clinical history and examination. Patellofemoral joint pain can be caused by,

incorrect knee cap alignment (caused by weakness or tightness in the hip or thigh muscles), overuse or overloading of the knee with exercise (walking, stairs, running, sports), poor knee and ankle flexibility, flat feet and fixed structural differences/misalignment (such as knock knees).

Symptoms of patellofemoral joint pain are pain with walking, pain with climbing stairs, pain after sitting with a bent knee for long periods and pain while squatting or lunging.

Patella Tendinopathy

Patella tendinopathy is the ‘umbrella term’ to describe tendon pathology of the patella tendon. Tendons are strong, rope-like structures that attach muscles to bone. Tendons although strong, can cause us pain when they are overused or under prepared for exercise. The tendon initially becomes inflamed and painful but still functions reasonably well. If left untreated and managed incorrectly it can develop into a chronic issue with weakness, persistent pain and an increased risk of tendon tearing or rupture. Patella tendinopathy is more common in runners, cyclists, and those who partake in sports that include jumping or running.

Symptoms of patella tendinopathy include:

  • Pain just above or below the knee cap
  • Minor swelling around the sore area
  • Knee stiffness
  • Pain with excessive knee usage or kneeling

Knee Osteoarthritis

Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is also known as degenerative joint disease, this is commonly a result of age-related changes, however it can also occur years after a trauma to the area or if the patient has had an excessive load placed through their knees, through their occupation or exercise (especially if its repetitive). It’s critical in OA that strength and movement exercises are performed for the hips and knees to slow the progression of the condition.

Symptoms of knee arthritis:

  • Gradual onset of knee pain
  • Stiffness in the mornings or after long periods of sitting
  • Minor knee swelling after exercise
  • Crepitus or clicking sounds within knee joint

Osgood – Schlatter Disease

Osgood-Schlatters disease is a type of apophysitis (inflammation of the bony growth plates in children). Osgood-Schlatters disease occurs in children’s shin bones from the quadriceps tendon repetitively stressing the growth plate. Osgoods-Schlatters disease requires careful exercise management during the painful stages to prevent progression of the disease and prevent fractures.

This disease is caused by overloading of the quadriceps tendon and the knee. The repetitive activity slowly begins to pull the growing bone away from the shin as it hasn’t completely fused together at such a young age. It is mostly common in active children between the ages of 10-15. Patients will particularly have flat feet or poor ankle/knee and hip posture, tightens of the quadricep muscle and partake in high physical and sporting activities that involve running and jumping.

Symptoms include:

  • Tenderness of the upper shin area
  • Pain just below the knee cap which increases with physical activity
  • Increased size of the tibial tuberosity

Baker’s Cyst

A Baker’s cyst is a type of swelling that occurs behind the knee. The swelling slowly builds over a long period of time with varying amounts of pain. Uncovering the causative factor for the Baker’s cyst is important to managing the condition properly. Incorrect management can result in years of frustrating knee pain or rupture of the cyst. Generally, Baker’s cysts occur when there is underlying damage to cartilage or ligaments within the knee. We commonly see individuals with Baker’s Cysts in either elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis or athletic patients with internal knee damage.

Symptoms include:

  • Pain at the back of the knee
  • Swelling at the back of the knee
  • Limited flexibility when bending and straightening the knee
  • Tightness or stiffness at the back of the knee

Muscle Strains & Tears

Muscles can be damaged suddenly while playing sport or performing activities of daily living but can also be strained slowly over a longer period of time. Strains and tears are categorised into three grades:

  • Grade 1 for mild strains
  • Grade 2 for moderate strains with swelling, bruising and weakness
  • Grade 3 for full rupture (the muscle ripping into two separate pieces)

The most common muscles injured around the knee include the quadriceps, hamstrings and calves. Muscle strains and tears happen for two reasons; either they have been overstretched or forced to contract too strongly. Muscle strains can occur in anyone whether they are sedentary or active but there is a high risk associated with people that partake in sports and recreational exercise.

Symptoms of a muscle strain or tear:

  • Sharp pain and tenderness over the strain area
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Pain on usage of the muscle
  • Weakness on usage of the muscle

Ligament Sprain & Rupture

Ligaments are the main supporting structures of joints. There are a number of important ligaments that support the knee joint and can be found internally and externally of the knee joint. These include the ACL (anterior cruciate), PCL (posterior cruciate), MCL and LCL (medial and lateral collateral ligaments). These ligaments can be damaged from activities or incidents that place excessive strain on them, this can range from minor strains to complete ruptures. Most commonly knee ligaments are damaged during traumatic incidents such as sports, falls or contact.

Symptoms of ligament sprain and rupture:

  • Sharp pain at the time of the injury
  • Pain while walking, twisting or bending the knee
  • Swelling of the knee
  • Instability or looseness of the knee

Meniscal Tear

The knee joint has two menisci’s, one on the inner and one on the outer aspects of the knee. They act as cushions or shock absorbers for the knee joint. A tear can occur to these important cushions which then alters the way people walk, bend, twist and climb stairs. In clinic meniscal issues are managed conservatively with treatment and exercise, and if need be, a referral for a surgical opinion. Meniscal tears are most commonly seen in athletes as a result of a sporting injury or from wear and tear and knee osteoarthritis.

Symptoms of meniscal tears:

  • Popping or clicking of the knee
  • Pain with bending the knee
  • Swelling of the knee joint
  • Pain when weight bearing
  • Pain on squatting and kneeling
  • Tenderness of the knee joint

Patellofemoral instability or dislocation

Patellofemoral instability is instability of the knee cap. This can be a common cause of pain, instability or giving way of the knee. It can be caused by dislocation due to trauma, incomplete development of the bone from birth, flat feet or weak quadriceps muscles. We mostly see teenagers or children with this type of knee pain.

Symptoms of patellofemoral instability:

  • Looseness of the knee cap on the thigh bone
  • Sensation of the knee giving way
  • Pain on lunging, squatting or climbing stairs
  • Swelling around the knee cap after activity

Treatment for knee pain

At The Homebody Clinic we are skilled to determining the cause, treatment and management of your knee pain. Your treatment plan will be tailored to you and will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal function and preventing re-injury of your knee.

Whilst diagnosing your knee pain, we can refer you for diagnostic imaging to confirm and are able to refer you to other health practitioners for example an exercise physiologist, clinical Pilates instructor or for surgical evaluation if need be.

Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), and/or exercise prescription. A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term.

Hip Pain

Hip pain is a common presenting complaint seen at The Homebody Clinic. Hip pain can present in infants, children, adolescents, young adults, right through to the elderly, and all for varying reasons. Our hips are the biggest weight bearing joint of our body and therefore can be more susceptible to injury through trauma, degeneration, sporting injuries, poor biomechanics and alignment. Your hips are important to support lower back movement as well as to set the biomechanics for the lower limb.

Some common causes of hip pain seen at The Homebody Clinic:

Gluteal Tendinopathy

Gluteal tendinopathy is the ‘umbrella term’ used to describe tendon pathology of the gluteal tendon. Tendons are strong, rope-like structures that attach muscles to bone, this means they are essential for making us mobile. Tendons can become damaged and cause us pain when they are overused or under prepared for exercise combined with excessive loading- which in the hip joint, is extremely common to see. If left untreated and managed incorrectly it can develop into a chronic issue with weakness, persistent pain and an increased risk of tendon rupture. As an osteopath, we always assess globally and holistically, so diagnosis and treatment of this area will always undertake an assessment of your knee, feet and footwear- especially if you are runner or walker. A patient will usually present with pain and tenderness over the outer bone of their hip, pain with walking, running and stair climbing, plus weakness to the hip/gluteal region.

Muscle Strains and Tears

Muscles are the power generating structures that make our body move. Muscles can be damaged suddenly while playing sport or performing activities of daily living but can also be strained slowly over a longer period of time. The degree of strain or tear can vary from mild to a full rupture, and can therefore vary in pain and treatment measures and management. Muscle strains and tears can occur at a higher risk if a person partakes in sport or exercise, especially if the person is unconditioned, and has poor biomechanics. A strain or tear can produce pain locally at the injured site as well as swelling, bruising and possibly weakness of the muscle.

Trochanteric Bursitis

A bursa is a fluid-filled sac that lies in-between bones and tendons to create shock absorption and reduce friction between the tissues of the body. Bursas are found in multiple joints around the body. Bursitis is inflammation of these fluid-filled sacs, and when inflamed can produce pain and therefore a reduction of movement in the joint. Bursitis can be due to an acute injury to the area, or from overuse, local muscle decompensations and poor posture and biomechanics. Pain will generally be on the outer aspect of the hip, and can refer down the outside of the thigh and exacerbated when walking, running or climbing stairs or lying on the affected side.

Osteoarthritis of the Hip Joint

Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is also known as degenerative joint disease. This is commonly a result of age-related changes or from overuse of the hip or a history of a previous hip trauma. It’s critical in OA patients that strength and movement exercises are performed for the hips and knees to slow the progression of the condition. A patient with hip OA will generally complain of slowly progressing pain, that is stiff and may be associated with crepitus or cracking sounds with movement of the hip.

Femoralacetabular Impingement (FAI)

FAI is a condition where the thigh bone and the hip socket contact each other. FAI can be caused by genetics, or repetitive hip rotation and flexion in the early childhood development years. Therefore, there is a higher incidence of FAI in adults who played high speed sports as children. A patient with FAI will present with pain in the hip, groin and buttock region, stiffness in these areas and pain aggravated by acceleration sports, squatting, climbing stairs and prolonged sitting. There is often an audible associated click or lock of the hip on movement as well.

Labral Tear

The labrum is a ring of cartilage that surrounds a joint to help with stability. Labrums can be found in the hip and shoulder joints and can be torn with trauma or from poor overuse. A tear can appear in any aspect of the labrum (front, back and top). Labral tears can be caused by excessive mechanical force through the hip which may happen with a fall, or from repetitive overuse at the joints end range. Presenting symptoms are pain at the front of the hip which may refer into the groin, there can be a clicking or popping sound associated or giving way and an unstable feeling of the hip.

Treatment and assessment of your hip pain will also be global. Proper biomechanics of the lower back and lower extremity are just as important to obtain a healthy functioning hip. Your treatment plan will be tailored to you and will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal function and preventing re-injury of your hip. Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), taping and/or exercise prescription. A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term.

Vertigo

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly treat patients suffering from vertigo. Vertigo is a sensation that either you, or the environment around you is moving or spinning- an often very unpleasant and debilitating feeling. There can be several causes for your vertigo, for example, infection, inner ear problems, migraines, medications or even an injury to the head or neck. Osteopaths can help differentiate the reason for your vertigo and where needed refer you for further testing or a specialist referral.

Once the cause of your vertigo is established, a gentle osteopathic treatment will aim to reduce the sensations of vertigo by focusing treatment on your head, TMJ (jaw), neck, upper back and your nervous system.

Whiplash

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly see patients who have experienced whiplash, whether it be from a recent accident or from an accident a decade or so ago. During a whiplash type accident, the neck experiences hyperflexion and hyperextension movements, meaning the neck moves back and forth too quickly and this can lead to minor or severe damage to the head and neck. Whiplash commonly occurs during a car accident, however it can also occur during a fall or a sporting injury. Sometimes the muscles and ligaments of your neck joints can become overstressed or over compressed and this can lead to neck pain, osteoarthritis and or headaches/migraines.

Again, due to the overstretched nature of a whiplash injury, osteopathic treatment is generally very gentle and works towards reducing tension in your neck muscles and joints as well as building strength back in your neck, shoulders and upper back.

Scoliosis

Scoliosis is diagnosed as an abnormal sideways curvature of the spine. The patient is most commonly diagnosed in adolescence, usually between the ages of 9-15.

If a teenager presents to The Homebody Clinic and scoliosis is suspected, we will confirm and monitor the curvature on an x-ray during the patients development and growth stages. Where needed your osteopath can refer for specialist review.

In a patient with scoliosis pain can vary from mild discomfort to severe, however most cases are mild. Some patients will grow out of their scoliosis through natural growing and development.

For adults- management of scoliosis is key. You might not feel any pain, it might be more cosmetic (i.e. noticing the uneven heights of your shoulders or hips) or you may have discomfort in certain regions – treatment and education on ways you can help manage your scoliosis yourself is imperative and can help alleviate your symptoms.

Symptoms of scoliosis include:

  • Uneven shoulder heights
  • Spinal or rib pain
  • One shoulder might appear more prominent than the other (rib hump sign)
  • Uneven waist
  • One hip higher than the other
  • Prominence of one side of the back when bending forward.

Osteopathic treatment can help to reduce pain and increase movement. Scoliosis generally is well managed, and adding in lifestyle modifications including exercise routines can help ease symptoms.

TMJ Pain

The Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a unique joint that acts as a sliding hinge- connecting your jaw to the rest of your skull.

TMJ pain can produce symptoms in the jaw, face, head and neck. TMJ pain is most commonly caused by stress, teeth clenching or grinding, poor posture and neck problems or from a trauma to the head such as a concussion or whiplash.

Common symptoms of TMJ disorder are:

  • Pain in the face, jaw, ear or inside the mouth
  • Clicking, locking or grinding sensations upon opening/ closing the jaw
  • Limited range of motion of the joint
  • Pain within the tissues that help to control jaw movement
  • Headache
  • Toothache

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly see patients with TMJ pain. Before treatment we will access the jaw and the surrounding areas such as your neck and upper extremity, to first diagnose the reason for your pain. Your treatment plan will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal function and preventing your jaw from re-injury, the focus will be on both the short and long term.

Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), cranial osteopathy (hyperlink) and/or exercise prescription.

RSI (Repetitive Strain Injury)

RSI can present in various parts of the body and more commonly would attribute to tendon pain. Due to how often we use our hands, RSI is most commonly found in the wrist, thumb or elbow.

Repetitive sports like golf or tennis may lead to this type of pain. However, we also see this commonly in clinic related to a patient’s job if a work-related task occurs on a repetitive basis, such as typing or holding heavy power tools. RSI means you are repeating a task constantly without much rest.

Your osteopath will access your postural position to help determine where you aren’t moving from and why, which may be placing extra load on the injured area.

Treatment will generally involve reducing tension in the painful areas, improving your joints range of motion, and then working on targeted and individualised exercises to strengthen the surrounding area to make sure this does not recur. Tendons respond well to loading. Rest doesn’t always fix things. Our management approach will work with you to help keep you at work or exercising in a pain free threshold.

Chronic Pain

1 in 5 people over 45 years old are living with consistent pain. 

Understanding pain helps us establish the root cause. A treatment and management plan for pain can be a time consuming and challenging process. 

The first step is to understand pain: 

  • Why am I experiencing pain? 
  • What is causing my pain? 
  • How do I become pain free? 

You might not know the answers to these questions which is what your osteopath or GP can help you identify. 

Chronic pain is often invisible and can be difficult for others to understand. We know pain is not a “one size fits all” approach. We understand that pain can be exhausting, isolating and depressing. 

Osteopaths will ask about your lifestyle, stress, past medical history and some in depth questioning to better understand your pain cycle. 

We help to restore the body to a sense of wellbeing and a natural state of health through gentle soft tissue treatment, joint movement and mobilisation, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink) and exercise rehabilitation. We work with the joints, muscles, bones and nervous system to help create change. Pain is individualised. Treatment is individualised. 

 

osteopathy Sunshine Coast

What We Treat

Headaches and Migraines

Headaches 

Headaches can vary broadly in their intensity and the affect they have on patients, therefore, treatment always needs to be individualised. At The Homebody Clinic we are passionate about finding the cause of your headaches which can help point us in the right direction on what to treat, how and what education/guidance we can give you to also help manage their frequency and intensity. We are passionate about helping headache suffers get their life back. 

At The Homebody Clinic, we have experience in treating the following types of headaches: 

  • Cervicogenic Headache – this type of headache has a direct cause and correlation to the structure and function of your neck. Typically, these headaches refer to one side of your head, starting from your neck, and present as an ache at the base of the skull, forehead, and behind the eyes and eyebrows. 
  • Post-Concussion Syndrome – this headache can be felt after there is impact with your head. It is often combined with dizziness, and problems with memory and concentration. If there are any concerning symptoms associated with your headache, we are able to refer you for further imaging and or investigation with your local GP. 
  • Sinus Headache – this type of headache is often felt below and or above the eyes and the pain is typically described as a strong pressure build up. 
  • Tension Type Headaches- a common and generally mild type headache that may be caused by poor posture, stress, poor ergonomics and/or jaw clenching. A tension type headache is generally described as a “vice like” band around your head. 
  • TMJ (jaw) Headache – this headache may be felt to the side of your temples and alongside your jaw. Grinding and teeth clenching, most likely accompanied by stress are often the main causes for this type of headache. 
  • Cluster Headache – typically a patient with this type of headache will present with severe unilateral pain, typically lasting 15-180 minutes, and perhaps felt a few times during the day. They will typically present in cycles, and be accompanied by pain free periods too. 

Migraines 

Migraines are a common neurological disorder. There are many different presentations of migraines – and pain can be felt in many different positions. There is no exact known cause for migraines, but there are a multitude of factors contributing to them; for example, stress, dehydration, poor sleep, medications, alcohol, certain foods, smoking, hormonal changes and head trauma. Migraines typically present as a throbbing or pulsating headache that can start off one-sided and last between 4-72 hours and can be accompanied with nausea or vomiting, sensitivity to light or sound or even changes in vision. 

Treatment 

Treatment of your headaches or migraines may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, stretching, joint manipulation, articulation, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), dry needling (hyperlink), manipulation, and/ or exercise/stretching prescription and modifications. 

During treatment it is often necessary to release chronic stress and strain from past injuries and trauma, particularly in your head and neck. This will not only help relieve the presenting headache or migraine but will also aim to reduce the chance of a recurrence. 

Neck Pain 

Unfortunately, neck pain is very common in our modern world and therefore a common presentation seen at The Homebody Clinic. There are many causes of neck pain and finding the root cause will determine the best management for you. Neck pain can arise from whiplash, phone or computer use, poor work posture, sporting injuries, stress, arthritis or mechanical stressors. 

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly see the following neck pain presentations: 

Facet Joint Sprain 

Facet joints are small joints on the back part of your spine which aid in providing different ranges of motion for your spine. Like other joints, facet joints can become inflamed, irritated or injured if they are progressively overloaded, stretched or compressed. Facet joint sprains can affect people of all ages. 

Symptoms of facet joint sprain: 

  • Neck pain and headaches. 
  • Limited range of movement – which can result in pain when the joint is moved in a particular direction, for example, looking up or rotating your neck. 
  • Pain that is worse in the morning or after neck movement.  
  • Tenderness of the neck muscles and joints. 

Osteoarthritis of The Neck 

Neck osteoarthritis (OA) is also known as degenerative joint disease, this is commonly a result of age-related changes, however it can also occur years after a trauma to the area, for example after a car accident or concussion. Most commonly OA is seen in patients that have experienced excessive load through their head and neck through their occupation or exercise, especially if repetitive. Unfortunately, in the modern world we are seeing higher rates of osteoarthritis due to poor posture associated with computer and mobile phone use. It’s critical in OA that strength and movement exercises are performed for the neck and upper body to slow the progression of the condition. 

Symptoms of osteoarthritis of the neck: 

  • Gradual onset of neck pain. 
  • Reduced neck flexibility. 
  • Stiffness in the mornings or after long periods of immobility. 
  • Crepitus or cracking sounds with neck movement. 
  • Headaches. 

Disc Injury 

Your spine is made up of vertebrae (bones) and discs. These spongy discs are located between each bone and are designed to be shock absorbers for the spine. Therefore, they contribute to protecting the health of the bones, joints and surrounding muscles. 

An acute injury can irritate and damage a disc, however, more commonly the outer layer of the disc becomes weak from minor tearing over time which can influence the integrity of the tissue. This weakened outer rim combined with excessive compression can make it vulnerable to injury. Acute trauma or significant force or impact to the head or neck can commonly cause disc injuries. Car accidents, whiplash injuries or work-place injuries can be examples of such trauma. Other examples include repeated minor injuries over a long period, strong head contact in sports, straining from repetitive lifting or prolonged and sustained poor postures, as well as age. 

Due to the close nature of the disc and the nerves in the neck, a disc injury can often impinge or compress nearby nerves and create neurological symptoms to the upper extremity. 

Symptoms of a disc injury: 

  • Neck and upper back pain. 
  • Headaches. 
  • Tenderness of the neck. 
  • Reduced neck flexibility. 
  • Pain on neck movement. 
  • If nerve compression is present people can experience; • Numbness or tingling in the arms, hands or fingers 
  • Weakness of the arm or hand 

If a disc injury is suspected it is likely we will refer you for further imaging to confirm the diagnosis and advice you on your most suitable management plan. 

Treatment 

At The Homebody Clinic we are skilled in determining the cause, treatment and management of your neck pain. Your treatment plan will be tailored to you and will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal function and preventing re-injury of your neck. 

Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink) stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), and/or exercise 

prescription. A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term. 

Upper Back & Rib pain 

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly see people affected by rib and or middle back pain. It is a really vital area of movement. Our ribs start from the top of the collar bone and take up approximately two thirds of your chest/abdomen region. Our ribs are important to protect our vital organs, assist us with breathing, and serve as attachment points for important muscles of the torso, shoulders, neck and lower back. 

Osteopaths see and treat musculoskeletal conditions that cause pain in the upper back and ribs. However, due to many organs being protected underneath this area there can often be a viscerosomatic referral pattern present. Our organs share the same nerve supply as some of the muscles and parts of the spinal column, so if one area is affected, another area can be as well. For example, your gall bladder can refer to your right shoulder blade/rib region and produce pain in that region. Osteopaths are skilled to diagnose a referral pattern, manage it and refer where needed. 

Conditions we commonly see in the upper back and rib cage at The Homebody Clinic: 

Facet Joint Sprain 

Thoracic facet joints are small joints at the posterolateral aspect of the thoracic spinal column. Their primary role is to help bear load through the thoracic spine. Like other joints, facet joints have a capsule of ligaments that surround them which can be susceptible to inflammation and damage if they are progressively overloaded, stretched or compressed. Similar to an ankle sprain, fast, sudden movements of the torso can sprain these joints, as can a whiplash type injury, repetitive coughing and or sneezing or lifting something heavy with poor biomechanics. Pain can present in the mid- back but also refer to the shoulder blade or sometimes to the chest and along the ribs. There is most commonly a sudden onset to pain with associated limited motion in your arms, torso and neck. 

A common presentation can be described as that annoying pain between your shoulder blades or an intense like a stabbing feeling or a constant ache that can’t be stretched out. 

Rib injuries can be acutely painful or constantly annoying and associated with poor ergonomics or desk posture. A lot of our daily tasks involves our arm out in front of us, for example, holding laundry, lifting kids, housework, mouse and desk work, and driving. Due to reduced shoulder blade strength and control, this means our ribs and muscles of the shoulder blade are susceptible to being pulled forward with these postures resulting in a rib sprain. 

Costochondritis 

Costochondritis is one of the most common causes of musculoskeletal chest pain. Costochondritis occurs when there is inflammation of the cartilage at the attachment sites of the ribs and the sternum (breast bone). At The Homebody Clinic we see this pain most commonly from repetitive overuse, however other causes such as persistent coughing, certain forms of arthritis and infections can also lead to costochondritis. Pain will often be present with breathing, and coughing or sneezing, and often accompanied by a radiation sensation along the rib line, providing pain in your chest, back or shoulder blade. Once the cause of costochondritis is identified by your osteopath, treatment of this area can be effective and relieving. 

Treatment 

Due to the close relationship the mid back and rib cage have with other areas of your body, treatment and assessment will usually involve other areas of your body such as your shoulder, neck, lower back and hips. Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink) stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), and/or exercise 

prescription. A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term. 

Lower Back Pain 

Statistics show eighty percent of the Australian population, regardless of age or gender, will suffer from back pain at some point in their lives. For many people this pain may be chronic, while for others it can resolve quickly. At The Homebody Clinic we appreciate how debilitating back pain can be and the impact it can have on your life. We are passionate about helping people suffering with back pain to lead a pain free, unrestricted life. 

At The Homebody Clinic, we have experience treating the following types of lower back pain: 

Joint or Facet Sprain 

Facet joints are small joints on the back part of your vertebrae which aid in providing different ranges of motion for your spine. Like other joints, facet joints have a capsule of ligaments that surround them, which can become inflamed or irritated if they are progressively overloaded, stretched or compressed. Pre-existing lumbar spine conditions, poor biomechanics and postural decompensations can increase the likelihood of irritation to these joints. The patient will usually present with lower back pain and a limited range of movement. 

Ligamentous and Capsular Strain  

Just like any other part of your body, your ligaments that surround, stabilise and support your spine can strain as well and reproduce pain and limited range of motion. Osteopaths are trained to diagnose which ligament may be affected and treat accordingly. Generally, a ligament will become damaged from an over extension of an activity or from poor lumbar biomechanics. 

Muscular Trigger Points  

Sensitive areas of tight muscle fibres can form in your muscles after injuries or overuse. These sensitive areas are called trigger points. A trigger point in a muscle can cause strain and pain throughout the muscle and sometimes produce a referral pain in a distinctive pattern. 

 Sciatica (Nerve Impingement) 

Nerve pain that is caused by irritation to the sciatic nerve is commonly known as sciatica. The sciatic nerve starts at your lower back, radiates deep into the buttock and runs along the back of both legs to the base of your foot. Typically, a patient presenting with sciatic irritation will describe a sharp burning and numbness sensation in a referral pattern. Sciatica can be relieved with gentle movement including walking, heat packs and manual therapy. There are many reasons for sciatic nerve impingement. A condition called piriformis syndrome can lead to sciatica, where the nerve is entrapped by tightness in the piriformis muscle (one of the gluteal muscles), producing pain and neurological radiation symptoms. It can also be caused from disc pathology to the low back, spinal stenosis, degeneration to the joints or discs of the back and may include muscle spasm of the back and buttock muscles. Your osteopath will take a thorough history, understand the reasons WHY this is happening and provide measures to help manage this condition to avoid recurrence. 

Disc Injury (Strain, Bulge or Prolapse)  

Anatomically, your spine is made up of bones (vertebrae) and discs. These spongy discs are located between each bone and are designed to act as shock absorbers. Therefore, they contribute to protecting the health of the bones, joints and surrounding muscles. An acute injury can irritate and damage a disc, however, more commonly we find the outer edge of the disc become weak from minor tearing over time which can influence the integrity of the tissue. This weakened outer rim combined with excessive compression can make it vulnerable to injury. Age, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and poor movement patterns or ergonomics can all increase your susceptibility to a disc problem. Symptoms may present as a broad lower back pain, reduction in range of motion and sometimes be accompanied by nerve compression symptoms such as numbness, weakness or tingling into the groin, leg, and/or buttock. 

Osteoarthritis of the Lumbar Spine 

Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease, is commonly a result of age-related changes. OA normally develops in people as they age, therefore it is more commonly seen in the elderly population. It’s critical in OA that strength and movement exercises are performed to maintain mobility and slow the progression of the condition. 

Spondylolisthesis 

Spondylolisthesis is the forward slippage of one vertebral body on the vertebral body below. This can create instability in the spine and cause lower back pain. It normally starts with stress fractures around the joints, which once broken can allow for this abnormal movement. Spondylolisthesis can occur from trauma especially in spinal hyperextension, degeneration or genetic defect. 

Sacroiliac Joint Sprain 

Your sacroiliac joints (SIJ) are joints formed on either side of your tailbone (sacrum) and the back of your pelvic bone (ilium). Like other joints, there are several strong ligamentous attachments to this joint to aid in stabilising it. When these ligaments become stretched it can result in unilateral or bilateral lower back pain. Pain can result from repetitive and prolonged leaning forward, or twisting activities and can be more common in pregnancy. Mostly the pain will be localised to just outside to the lower spine, but can also refer to the inner groin and can produce a sharp or dull aching sensation. 

Viscerosomatic Referral  

The spine and organs share similar nerve and vascular supply. Therefore, if there is a distribution at the spine, it can often affect the referral organ, and visa-versa. For example, right shoulder pain can be associated with irritation to your gall bladder. Osteopaths are trained to diagnose and differentiate between back pain from a musculoskeletal cause, and back pain from a visceral origin through the use of a thorough case history and examination and then treat and manage accordingly. 

Treatment 

At The Homebody Clinic we are skilled to help determine the cause of your lower back pain, treatment and management. Your treatment plan will reflect an individualised plan that will focus on reducing your pain, restoring your normal function, preventing re-injury but also educating you on your pain and how you can best manage it for the future too. Your management plan may include stretching/strengthening exercises, along with ergonomic review and if need be a referral to another therapist such as a Pilates instructor or an exercise physiologist. 

Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), and/or exercise prescription. 

Arthritis 

Arthritis is the leading cause of chronic pain and can have a severe impact on a patient’s quality of life. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis and they vary greatly in impact, severity and symptoms. 

Osteoarthritis 

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of joint disease. Osteoarthritis most commonly affects the weight bearing joints, such as the knee, hip, fingers and big toe. 

The most common symptoms are: 

Pain and stiffness of the joints that develops slowly, over months or even years 

Usually worse on an activity like using stairs, but can also be very achy at night 

Audible clicking, grinding and/or popping sounds is common 

Loss of mobility in the joint 

Rheumatoid Arthritis 

Rheumatoid arthritis is a common autoimmune disease and a form of inflammatory arthritis. In rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system targets the lining of the joints, causing inflammation and joint damage, resulting in pain of bilateral joints. 

The most common symptoms are: 

  • Joint pain, swelling, and tenderness to touch. 
  • Stiffness in the joints, especially in the morning.
  • Symmetrical, for example both shoulders, or both hips. 

There is currently no cure for the majority of arthritic conditions, however the research is very consistent that movement helps, and not moving can often make your arthritis worse. Reducing your pain will be our first goal in order to get the joint back moving soon and get you back to exercise. We will also educate you on beneficial exercises/activities to do, exercises to avoid and any other diet/lifestyle factors that can help. 

Shoulder Pain 

Shoulder pain is a common presentation seen at The Homebody Clinic. The shoulder joint is said to be the most complex joint of the body. It has this fascinating ability to provide great strength to the upper body and as a result allows us to achieve many of our daily life activities, whilst maintaining mobility. Due to its incredible flexibility, it requires muscle stability and sound biomechanics to function correctly. Unfortunately, similarly to the neck, shoulder pain has become increasingly common in our modern world due to the increase in computer work and phone usage. 

Some causes of shoulder pain we can assist with at The Homebody Clinic are: 

  • Rotator Cuff Tears/Strains/Tendonitis/Tendinopathy 

 The rotator cuff is a group of small muscles that surround the shoulder joint. They are responsible for providing most of the stability to the shoulder joint. While an injury may occur to one particular muscle or tendon in the rotator cuff they work as a synergistic team, therefore treatment and rehabilitation focuses on the whole rotator cuff, rather than a single muscle. The degree of tear or strain to the rotator cuff can vary from a mild strain to a full rupture. Issues to this area are generally from poor posture or from the rotator cuff being overstretched or over strengthened (too hard and or too fast). Other common causes include throwing sports, heavy manual labour especially overhead work, repetitive arm movement and lack of rest. Rotator cuff issues will present with pain or weakness overhead, tenderness over the shoulder joint as well as stiffness and pain whilst lying on the affected shoulder. 

Shoulder Impingement 

Shoulder impingement occurs when shoulder tendons (biceps or rotator cuff tendons) and/or the subacromial bursa become entrapped and compressed due to insufficient space between the head of the humerus and the tip of the shoulder blade. This impingement can lead to inflammation and therefore pain especially of arm movement away from the body. Focus of treatment is around increasing space in the shoulder and surrounding joints to reduce the inflammation and pain. There is always a big focus on the “why?” and the cause of this impingement to help prevent reoccurrence. 

Frozen shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis) 

Adhesive capsulitis is an acute inflammatory condition that can arise spontaneously or after an injury or shoulder surgery. This condition can last over a year, and generally occurs in 3 stages. If the patient has frozen shoulder, they will generally present with shoulder pain and accompanied stiffness. Treatment can help reduce the pain as well as the time frame of this chronic condition. 

Postural Tension/Decompensations 

Should pain related to posture is unfortunately extremely common in our modern world due to our use of devices and our increase in stress and a sedentary lifestyle. Tension in the shoulder can lead to shoulder pain, neck pain, headaches, upper extremity nerve pain and more. Treatment aims to release the tension, improve your posture and shoulder and neck biomechanics but also educate you on ways to improve this over the long-term including ergonomics and exercises to help. 

Labral Tear 

The labrum is a ring of cartilage that surrounds a joint to help with stability. The labrum tissue can be found in the hip and shoulder joints and can be torn with trauma or from poor overuse/poor biomechanics leading to wear and tear. A tear can appear in any aspect of the labrum (front, back and top). Labral tears can be caused by excessive mechanical force through the shoulder which may happen with a fall or a dislocation, or from repetitive overuse at the joints end range. Patients complain of pain at the front of the shoulder which may refer down the arm or to the shoulder blade, there can be a clicking or popping sound associated or giving way and an unstable feeling of the shoulder. Treatment will focus on education to help strengthen the area and further stabilise the joint, as well as focusing on techniques to work on better alignment and biomechanics of the joint to assist reducing the load off the injured labrum, aiming to prevent further damage. 

Referred Pain  

Pain in the shoulder can sometimes be unrelated to the musculoskeletal structures in the area and can instead be a referral, either a viserosomatic referral from related organs, or from structures above and below the shoulder area. Referred pain will most commonly be from your neck or in some cases the diaphragm (your primary breathing muscle) or from certain organs such as the gallbladder or the heart. 

Symptoms of shoulder pain may include∶ 

  • ‘catching’ sensation when raising the arm or reaching 
  • sharp pain when moving your arm 
  • weakness in your arm or grip strength 
  • throbbing and aching in shoulder whilst sleeping/lying on that side 
  • pain radiating down the arm (can also be described as numbness, tingling or weakness) 
  • neck and shoulder stiffness 

Once a sound diagnosis is made, we will aim to reduce your shoulder pain and improve your condition by increasing muscular flexibility to the shoulder, neck, mid back, chest and shoulder blade. It is very common for treatment of your shoulder to also consist of assessment and treatment of your neck, jaw, mid back, shoulder blade, lower back and upper extremity due to the postural strains and decompensations that could occur in surrounding joints and lead to your shoulder problem. 

To aid in your shoulder recovery it is common to leave treatment with a sound education on ways you too can manage your pain, whether that be by providing stretching and strengthening exercises and/or education about desk or work ergonomics. Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), or dry needling (hyperlink). A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term. At The Homebody Clinic we may refer you for scans, or to another therapist or specialists that can help with conjunct to hands-on treatment if need be. 

Sports Injuries 

Whether you are an elite athlete or a social, weekend sportsperson, at The Homebody Clinic we can help prevent and treat many sporting injuries, including: 

  • Rotator cuff strain, sprain, tendinitis or tear 
  • Shoulder dislocation rehabilitation 
  • Tennis and golfer’s elbow 
  • Wrist and finger sprains 
  • Lower back injuries 
  • Groin strain and tear 
  • Hamstring strain and tear 
  • Corked thigh 
  • Osteitis pubis 
  • Patella tracking disorder 
  • Sprain or tear of ACL, PCL, MCL, LCL 
  • Meniscus injuries 
  • Bursitis of the shoulder, elbow and hip 
  • Shin splints and stress fractures 
  • Compartment syndrome 
  • Calf strain or tear 
  • Ankle sprain 
  • Achilles sprain and tendonitis 
  • Plantar fasciitis 

At The Homebody Clinic we can diagnose your sporting injury and if need be, refer you for appropriate imaging. The diagnosis is important, but even more so is to identify and treat the cause of your injury. We will assess the function of your muscles and joints and determine if muscular weakness or joint stiffness predisposed you to your injury. 

Our biggest goal is to get you back exercising as soon as possible and to keep you moving, however that 

may look. If there is a time where you need to rest from your sport due to injury, we can help advise on other ways to exercise, or stretch/strengthen your body so you can remain active, as we know that is incredibly important for physical and mental health. We have a strong relationship with local Pilates, yoga studios and gyms over the Sunshine Coast and have found this important in getting you back to exercise as efficiently and safely as possible. 

Sophie is also a yoga teacher and anatomy teacher for yoga students so has an in-depth knowledge of yoga pose modifications and was to keep you practicing and stretching, regardless of your injury. 

At The Homebody Clinic we also encourage maintenance type treatments if you are exercising or competing on a regular basis. This can help reduce incidence of injury and help keep you on track to assist in your performance. Treatment can help maintain the alignment and biomechanics of your joints which is integral for your body’s function and to help reduce injury. 

Wrist & Hand Pain 

Our wrist and hands are widely used in our day-to-day activities, they are the key to us completing simple and complex coordinated tasks throughout the day. Our wrists and hands are prone to overuse (especially in our modern world) and tend to also be the first thing we fall on! 

Both the wrist and hands are made up of an extensive array of ligaments, muscles, tendons, joints, nerves and blood vessels – which if injured, can result in more than just pain – but can affect fine motor skills, coordination, strength and sensation (pins and needles or numbness). 

Some causes of wrist/hand pain we can assist you with at The Homebody Clinic are: 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome 

In the wrist we have 8 small bones that lie in two rows under our fingers, that are covered by a piece of connective tissue. Collectively, this creates the carpal tunnel. The carpal tunnel plays an important role in protecting nerves and blood vessels that run underneath it, as well as keeping the forearm tendons intact when we move our fingers. If the tunnel becomes compromised (compressed, inflamed or irritated) and the space becomes reduced, pressure can be placed on the nerve that passes through this tunnel, and supplies the thumb, index, middle and part of the ring finger with sensation and strength. If this nerve compresses, it can lead to numbness, tingling, burning or a sharp pain in the affected fingers as well as weakness and pain sleeping. 

This is a pain we commonly treat at The Homebody Clinic, especially if there has been a fall to the area, the patient is pregnant and or there is repetitive overuse of the hand and wrist. 

De Querviain’s Tenosynovitis 

De Querviain’s Tenosynovitis is swelling with accompanied pain on the tendons that run along the thumb side of the hand and attach to the base of the thumb. Again, repetitive overuse and strain of these tendons 

  • Tennis elbow which is tendinopathy of the extensor muscles known as lateral epicondylitis. 
  • Golfers elbow which is tendinopathy of the flexor muscles of the forearm, also known as medial epicondylitis. 

This is a common cause of tendon inflammation. The patient will present with local swelling and pain and weakness during wrist and hand movements such as gripping or holding. 

Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear 

The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is a made up of cartilage, ligaments and other soft tissues to form a complex. The complex acts to stabilise the forearm bones at the end of the forearm. Damage to this complex can result in pain on the pinky finger side of the wrist, and there is often an associated click with the pain. A patient will often report the wrist feeling unstable with a presented weakness. Again, due to our modern world, this injury can come from wear and tear, as well as a fall or fracture to the hand. 

Ligament Damage/Joint Sprain 

Within the wrist joint there are a number of important ligaments that aid in supporting the joint. Similar to other areas of the body, the ligaments of the wrist can become damaged or irritated from excessive strain on them. Ligament sprains can result in swelling, pain and tenderness and sometimes bruising. Pain is usually exacerbated with heavy lifting and this can result in weakness of the area. 

Treatment 

Your osteopath at The Homebody Clinic is skilled to diagnose and treat your wrist and hand. Treatment and management of your pain will focus on pain reduction, restoring function and preventing re-injury. Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), and/or stretching and strengthening prescription. A personalised management plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term. 

Elbow Pain 

We forget how much we use our arms – until we cant! 

Overuse of the forearm muscles can particularly come from workplace ergonomics. Having an appropriate workplace set up is integral to helping this heal efficiently. Keyboard, mouse position, desk height, laptop or monitor height and chair set up can play a big part. Educating you on correct ergonomics is something we can help you with. 

Getting on top of elbow pain early helps! 

Conditions of the elbow we commonly treat at The Homebody Clinic: 

Epicondylitis – Tendons are strong, rope-like structures that attach muscles to bone, this means they are essential for making us mobile. Tendons mostly become inflamed when they are overused or under prepared for exercise/repetitive strength movements. 

The two types of epicondylitis we treat are: 

In tendinopathies the tendon initially becomes inflamed and painful but still functions reasonably well. If left untreated and managed incorrectly it can develop into a chronic issue with weakness, persistent pain and an increased risk of tendon tearing or rupture. 

The increase usage of devices in the modern world can lead to tendon damage, as well as physical jobs that require heavy manual labour, and repetitive tasks from improper biomechanics are the common causes for tendon inflammation. 

Forearm Muscle Strains

Muscles are the power generating structures that make our body move. Muscles can be damaged suddenly while playing sport or performing activities of daily living but can also be strained slowly over a longer period of time. Strains and tears can vary from a mild tear to a full rupture and therefore treatment and management will also vary. A strain will typically produce sharp pain and tenderness over the affected muscle and sometimes result in swelling and or bruising. 

Ligament Sprains

Within the elbow joint there are a number of important ligaments including your ulnar collateral ligament (on the inside of the elbow) and the lateral collateral ligament (on the outside of the elbow) that aid in supporting the joint. Ligaments can become damaged or irritated from excessive strain on them and this can range from a slight overstretch to a complete rupture. If they become damaged, pain is a common symptom that can range from mild to severe, as well as possible weakness and localised swelling, and reduced stability within the elbow. 

Treatment 

At The Homebody Clinic we are skilled to diagnose and manage your elbow pain. Your treatment plan will be tailored to you and will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal function and preventing re-injury of your elbow. Gentle stretching, soft tissue treatment and strengthening can help with elbow pain, as well as measures like bracing and postural positions that your osteopath will discuss if this is needed for you. A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term. 

Foot & Ankle Pain 

Did you know your foot has 26 bones, 30 joints, more than 100 muscles, tendons and ligaments- our feet literally hold us up! 

Foot pain is a common presentation seen at The Homebody Clinic. Foot pain can present in people of all ages and activity levels. Foot injuries can occur from acute trauma, sporting injuries, prolonged stress, age or postural changes. The posture of your feet is not only critical for the health of your feet but also the structures above them- which includes your whole body! 

Osteopaths are trained in assessing and treating the foot for a myriad of conditions- our aim is to reduce your pain and get you back doing what you love as soon as possible as we know how debilitating foot pain can be. We can help with arthritis, gout, sprained ankles, mortons neuroma, shin splints, tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, flat feet and many more. 

At The Homebody Clinic we are skilled in determining the cause, treatment and management of your foot pain. Your treatment plan will be tailored to you and will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal 

function and preventing re-injury of your foot. Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, stretching, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink) joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), and/or exercise prescription. 

A personalised management plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term. If need be, we can also refer you for imaging, to a podiatrist or exercise physiologist to aid in your recovery. 

Knee Pain 

Knee pain is one of the most common areas we treat at The Homebody Clinic. Knee pain can present in people of all ages and activity levels. Knee pain can be caused by trauma, exercise, degeneration, and most commonly referred from injuries or misalignment of the same side hip or foot/ankle. As the knee joint sits in-between the foot/ankle and the hip it can often be affected and take too much load or a poor distribution of weight by the above and below joints. Your keens are vital for key daily movements, such as bending, lifting, walking and running, therefore knee pain can be debilitating and very disruptive. 

Ligaments, tendons and muscles are crucial for optimal function of your lower limb. At The Homebody Clinic we aim to reduce your knee pain, strengthen your knee joint and prevent further knee injuries by diagnosing, treating and educating you on your pain. 

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly see the following knee pain presentations: 

Patellofemoral Joint Pain 

Patellofemoral joint pain this is an ‘umbrella’ term used to describe pain in the soft tissues around the knee cap when there is no diagnosis on x-rays and MRI’s. This means the diagnosis weighs heavily on a thorough clinical history and examination. Patellofemoral joint pain can be caused by, 

incorrect knee cap alignment (caused by weakness or tightness in the hip or thigh muscles), overuse or overloading of the knee with exercise (walking, stairs, running, sports), poor knee and ankle flexibility, flat feet and fixed structural differences/misalignment (such as knock knees). 

Symptoms of patellofemoral joint pain are pain with walking, pain with climbing stairs, pain after sitting with a bent knee for long periods and pain while squatting or lunging. 

Patella Tendinopathy 

Patella tendinopathy is the ‘umbrella term’ to describe tendon pathology of the patella tendon. Tendons are strong, rope-like structures that attach muscles to bone. Tendons although strong, can cause us pain when they are overused or under prepared for exercise. The tendon initially becomes inflamed and painful but still functions reasonably well. If left untreated and managed incorrectly it can develop into a chronic issue with weakness, persistent pain and an increased risk of tendon tearing or rupture. Patella tendinopathy is more common in runners, cyclists, and those who partake in sports that include jumping or running. 

Symptoms of patella tendinopathy include: 

  • Pain just above or below the knee cap 
  • Minor swelling around the sore area 
  • Knee stiffness 
  • Pain with excessive knee usage or kneeling 

Knee Osteoarthritis 

Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is also known as degenerative joint disease, this is commonly a result of age-related changes, however it can also occur years after a trauma to the area or if the patient has had an excessive load placed through their knees, through their occupation or exercise (especially if its repetitive). It’s critical in OA that strength and movement exercises are performed for the hips and knees to slow the progression of the condition. 

Symptoms of knee arthritis: 

  • Gradual onset of knee pain 
  • Stiffness in the mornings or after long periods of sitting 
  • Minor knee swelling after exercise 
  • Crepitus or clicking sounds within knee joint 

Osgood – Schlatter Disease 

Osgood-Schlatters disease is a type of apophysitis (inflammation of the bony growth plates in children). Osgood-Schlatters disease occurs in children’s shin bones from the quadriceps tendon repetitively stressing the growth plate. Osgoods-Schlatters disease requires careful exercise management during the painful stages to prevent progression of the disease and prevent fractures. 

This disease is caused by overloading of the quadriceps tendon and the knee. The repetitive activity slowly begins to pull the growing bone away from the shin as it hasn’t completely fused together at such a young age. It is mostly common in active children between the ages of 10-15. Patients will particularly have flat feet or poor ankle/knee and hip posture, tightens of the quadricep muscle and partake in high physical and sporting activities that involve running and jumping. 

Symptoms include: 

  • Tenderness of the upper shin area 
  • Pain just below the knee cap which increases with physical activity 
  • Increased size of the tibial tuberosity 

Baker’s Cyst 

A Baker’s cyst is a type of swelling that occurs behind the knee. The swelling slowly builds over a long period of time with varying amounts of pain. Uncovering the causative factor for the Baker’s cyst is important to managing the condition properly. Incorrect management can result in years of frustrating knee pain or rupture of the cyst. Generally, Baker’s cysts occur when there is underlying damage to cartilage or ligaments within the knee. We commonly see individuals with Baker’s Cysts in either elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis or athletic patients with internal knee damage. 

Symptoms include: 

  • Pain at the back of the knee 
  • Swelling at the back of the knee 
  • Limited flexibility when bending and straightening the knee 
  • Tightness or stiffness at the back of the knee 

Muscle Strains & Tears 

Muscles can be damaged suddenly while playing sport or performing activities of daily living but can also be strained slowly over a longer period of time. Strains and tears are categorised into three grades: 

  • Grade 1 for mild strains 
  • Grade 2 for moderate strains with swelling, bruising and weakness 
  • Grade 3 for full rupture (the muscle ripping into two separate pieces) 

The most common muscles injured around the knee include the quadriceps, hamstrings and calves. Muscle strains and tears happen for two reasons; either they have been overstretched or forced to contract too strongly. Muscle strains can occur in anyone whether they are sedentary or active but there is a high risk associated with people that partake in sports and recreational exercise. 

Symptoms of a muscle strain or tear: 

  • Sharp pain and tenderness over the strain area 
  • Swelling 
  • Bruising 
  • Pain on usage of the muscle 
  • Weakness on usage of the muscle 

Ligament Sprain & Rupture 

Ligaments are the main supporting structures of joints. There are a number of important ligaments that support the knee joint and can be found internally and externally of the knee joint. These include the ACL (anterior cruciate), PCL (posterior cruciate), MCL and LCL (medial and lateral collateral ligaments). These ligaments can be damaged from activities or incidents that place excessive strain on them, this can range from minor strains to complete ruptures. Most commonly knee ligaments are damaged during traumatic incidents such as sports, falls or contact. 

Symptoms of ligament sprain and rupture: 

  • Sharp pain at the time of the injury 
  • Pain while walking, twisting or bending the knee 
  • Swelling of the knee 
  • Instability or looseness of the knee 

Meniscal Tear 

The knee joint has two menisci’s, one on the inner and one on the outer aspects of the knee. They act as cushions or shock absorbers for the knee joint. A tear can occur to these important cushions which then alters the way people walk, bend, twist and climb stairs. In clinic meniscal issues are managed conservatively with treatment and exercise, and if need be, a referral for a surgical opinion. Meniscal tears are most commonly seen in athletes as a result of a sporting injury or from wear and tear and knee osteoarthritis. 

Symptoms of meniscal tears: 

  • Popping or clicking of the knee 
  • Pain with bending the knee 
  • Swelling of the knee joint 
  • Pain when weight bearing 
  • Pain on squatting and kneeling 
  • Tenderness of the knee joint 

Patellofemoral instability or dislocation 

Patellofemoral instability is instability of the knee cap. This can be a common cause of pain, instability or giving way of the knee. It can be caused by dislocation due to trauma, incomplete development of the bone from birth, flat feet or weak quadriceps muscles. We mostly see teenagers or children with this type of knee pain. 

Symptoms of patellofemoral instability: 

  • Looseness of the knee cap on the thigh bone 
  • Sensation of the knee giving way 
  • Pain on lunging, squatting or climbing stairs 
  • Swelling around the knee cap after activity 

Treatment for knee pain 

At The Homebody Clinic we are skilled to determining the cause, treatment and management of your knee pain. Your treatment plan will be tailored to you and will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal function and preventing re-injury of your knee. 

Whilst diagnosing your knee pain, we can refer you for diagnostic imaging to confirm and are able to refer you to other health practitioners for example an exercise physiologist, clinical Pilates instructor or for surgical evaluation if need be. 

Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), and/or exercise prescription. A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term. 

Hip Pain 

Hip pain is a common presenting complaint seen at The Homebody Clinic. Hip pain can present in infants, children, adolescents, young adults, right through to the elderly, and all for varying reasons. Our hips are the biggest weight bearing joint of our body and therefore can be more susceptible to injury through trauma, degeneration, sporting injuries, poor biomechanics and alignment. Your hips are important to support lower back movement as well as to set the biomechanics for the lower limb. 

Some common causes of hip pain seen at The Homebody Clinic: 

Gluteal Tendinopathy 

Gluteal tendinopathy is the ‘umbrella term’ used to describe tendon pathology of the gluteal tendon. Tendons are strong, rope-like structures that attach muscles to bone, this means they are essential for making us mobile. Tendons can become damaged and cause us pain when they are overused or under prepared for exercise combined with excessive loading- which in the hip joint, is extremely common to see. If left untreated and managed incorrectly it can develop into a chronic issue with weakness, persistent pain and an increased risk of tendon rupture. As an osteopath, we always assess globally and holistically, so diagnosis and treatment of this area will always undertake an assessment of your knee, feet and footwear- especially if you are runner or walker. A patient will usually present with pain and tenderness over the outer bone of their hip, pain with walking, running and stair climbing, plus weakness to the hip/gluteal region. 

Muscle Strains and Tears 

Muscles are the power generating structures that make our body move. Muscles can be damaged suddenly while playing sport or performing activities of daily living but can also be strained slowly over a longer period of time. The degree of strain or tear can vary from mild to a full rupture, and can therefore vary in pain and treatment measures and management. Muscle strains and tears can occur at a higher risk if a person partakes in sport or exercise, especially if the person is unconditioned, and has poor biomechanics. A strain or tear can produce pain locally at the injured site as well as swelling, bruising and possibly weakness of the muscle. 

Trochanteric Bursitis 

A bursa is a fluid-filled sac that lies in-between bones and tendons to create shock absorption and reduce friction between the tissues of the body. Bursas are found in multiple joints around the body. Bursitis is inflammation of these fluid-filled sacs, and when inflamed can produce pain and therefore a reduction of movement in the joint. Bursitis can be due to an acute injury to the area, or from overuse, local muscle decompensations and poor posture and biomechanics. Pain will generally be on the outer aspect of the hip, and can refer down the outside of the thigh and exacerbated when walking, running or climbing stairs or lying on the affected side. 

Osteoarthritis of the Hip Joint 

Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is also known as degenerative joint disease. This is commonly a result of age-related changes or from overuse of the hip or a history of a previous hip trauma. It’s critical in OA patients that strength and movement exercises are performed for the hips and knees to slow the progression of the condition. A patient with hip OA will generally complain of slowly progressing pain, that is stiff and may be associated with crepitus or cracking sounds with movement of the hip. 

Femoralacetabular Impingement (FAI) 

FAI is a condition where the thigh bone and the hip socket contact each other. FAI can be caused by genetics, or repetitive hip rotation and flexion in the early childhood development years. Therefore, there is a higher incidence of FAI in adults who played high speed sports as children. A patient with FAI will present with pain in the hip, groin and buttock region, stiffness in these areas and pain aggravated by acceleration sports, squatting, climbing stairs and prolonged sitting. There is often an audible associated click or lock of the hip on movement as well. 

Labral Tear 

The labrum is a ring of cartilage that surrounds a joint to help with stability. Labrums can be found in the hip and shoulder joints and can be torn with trauma or from poor overuse. A tear can appear in any aspect of the labrum (front, back and top). Labral tears can be caused by excessive mechanical force through the hip which may happen with a fall, or from repetitive overuse at the joints end range. Presenting symptoms are pain at the front of the hip which may refer into the groin, there can be a clicking or popping sound associated or giving way and an unstable feeling of the hip. 

Treatment and assessment of your hip pain will also be global. Proper biomechanics of the lower back and lower extremity are just as important to obtain a healthy functioning hip. Your treatment plan will be tailored to you and will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal function and preventing re-injury of your hip. Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink), stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), taping and/or exercise prescription. A personalised treatment plan will aid in managing the injury and associated pain in the short and long term. 

Vertigo 

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly treat patients suffering from vertigo. Vertigo is a sensation that either you, or the environment around you is moving or spinning- an often very unpleasant and debilitating feeling. There can be several causes for your vertigo, for example, infection, inner ear problems, migraines, medications or even an injury to the head or neck. Osteopaths can help differentiate the reason for your vertigo and where needed refer you for further testing or a specialist referral. 

Once the cause of your vertigo is established, a gentle osteopathic treatment will aim to reduce the sensations of vertigo by focusing treatment on your head, TMJ (jaw), neck, upper back and your nervous system. 

Whiplash 

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly see patients who have experienced whiplash, whether it be from a recent accident or from an accident a decade or so ago. During a whiplash type accident, the neck experiences hyperflexion and hyperextension movements, meaning the neck moves back and forth too quickly and this can lead to minor or severe damage to the head and neck. Whiplash commonly occurs during a car accident, however it can also occur during a fall or a sporting injury. Sometimes the muscles and ligaments of your neck joints can become overstressed or over compressed and this can lead to neck pain, osteoarthritis and or headaches/migraines. 

Again, due to the overstretched nature of a whiplash injury, osteopathic treatment is generally very gentle and works towards reducing tension in your neck muscles and joints as well as building strength back in your neck, shoulders and upper back. 

Scoliosis 

Scoliosis is diagnosed as an abnormal sideways curvature of the spine. The patient is most commonly diagnosed in adolescence, usually between the ages of 9-15. 

If a teenager presents to The Homebody Clinic and scoliosis is suspected, we will confirm and monitor the curvature on an x-ray during the patients development and growth stages. Where needed your osteopath can refer for specialist review. 

In a patient with scoliosis pain can vary from mild discomfort to severe, however most cases are mild. Some patients will grow out of their scoliosis through natural growing and development. 

For adults- management of scoliosis is key. You might not feel any pain, it might be more cosmetic (i.e. noticing the uneven heights of your shoulders or hips) or you may have discomfort in certain regions – treatment and education on ways you can help manage your scoliosis yourself is imperative and can help alleviate your symptoms. 

Symptoms of scoliosis include: 

  • Uneven shoulder heights 
  • Spinal or rib pain 
  • One shoulder might appear more prominent than the other (rib hump sign) 
  • Uneven waist 
  • One hip higher than the other 
  • Prominence of one side of the back when bending forward. 

Osteopathic treatment can help to reduce pain and increase movement. Scoliosis generally is well managed, and adding in lifestyle modifications including exercise routines can help ease symptoms. 

TMJ Pain 

The Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a unique joint that acts as a sliding hinge- connecting your jaw to the rest of your skull. 

TMJ pain can produce symptoms in the jaw, face, head and neck. TMJ pain is most commonly caused by stress, teeth clenching or grinding, poor posture and neck problems or from a trauma to the head such as a concussion or whiplash. 

Common symptoms of TMJ disorder are: 

  • Pain in the face, jaw, ear or inside the mouth 
  • Clicking, locking or grinding sensations upon opening/ closing the jaw 
  • Limited range of motion of the joint 
  • Pain within the tissues that help to control jaw movement 
  • Headache 
  • Toothache 

At The Homebody Clinic we commonly see patients with TMJ pain. Before treatment we will access the jaw and the surrounding areas such as your neck and upper extremity, to first diagnose the reason for your pain. Your treatment plan will focus on reducing pain, restoring normal function and preventing your jaw from re-injury, the focus will be on both the short and long term. 

Treatment may include soft tissue massage, muscle energy techniques, stretching, joint mobilisation, articulation, manipulation, dry needling (hyperlink), cranial osteopathy (hyperlink) and/or exercise prescription. 

RSI (Repetitive Strain Injury) 

RSI can present in various parts of the body and more commonly would attribute to tendon pain. Due to how often we use our hands, RSI is most commonly found in the wrist, thumb or elbow. 

Repetitive sports like golf or tennis may lead to this type of pain. However, we also see this commonly in clinic related to a patient’s job if a work-related task occurs on a repetitive basis, such as typing or holding heavy power tools. RSI means you are repeating a task constantly without much rest. 

Your osteopath will access your postural position to help determine where you aren’t moving from and why, which may be placing extra load on the injured area. 

Treatment will generally involve reducing tension in the painful areas, improving your joints range of motion, and then working on targeted and individualised exercises to strengthen the surrounding area to make sure this does not recur. Tendons respond well to loading. Rest doesn’t always fix things. Our management approach will work with you to help keep you at work or exercising in a pain free threshold. 

Chronic Pain 

1 in 5 people over 45 years old are living with consistent pain. 

Understanding pain helps us establish the root cause. A treatment and management plan for pain can be a time consuming and challenging process. 

The first step is to understand pain: 

  • Why am I experiencing pain? 
  • What is causing my pain? 
  • How do I become pain free? 

You might not know the answers to these questions which is what your osteopath or GP can help you identify. 

Chronic pain is often invisible and can be difficult for others to understand. We know pain is not a “one size fits all” approach. We understand that pain can be exhausting, isolating and depressing. 

Osteopaths will ask about your lifestyle, stress, past medical history and some in depth questioning to better understand your pain cycle. 

We help to restore the body to a sense of wellbeing and a natural state of health through gentle soft tissue treatment, joint movement and mobilisation, cranial osteopathy (hyperlink) and exercise rehabilitation. We work with the joints, muscles, bones and nervous system to help create change. Pain is individualised. Treatment is individualised.